6099 Stirling Road Suite 107
Davie, FL 33314
(954) 533-3974
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Early Chromolithography: late 1800’s to early 1900’s

On view are original chromos mainly from newspapers such as the Chicago Tribune and Philadelphia Inquirer, and other major cities, from the late 1800’s to early 20th century. The subject matter of the chromos are of historical and social interest today because they give the viewer insight into what the public of that time was interested in seeing.


 
Oriental Flower Girl
Art Supplement: Philadelphia press
 Sun. Jan. 9 , 1895
Printed by Ketterlinus
 


Where: The Art & Frame Shop and The Williams Gallery

Dates:  Saturday June 6 through Tuesday June 30, 2009

Opening Reception: Saturday June 6,  4:00 PM – 6:00 PM (free to the public)

Location:
6099  Stirling Road Suite 107
Davie, FL 33314

(Triangle Professional Building)

Phone: (954) 533-3974
Email: fineartandframes@earthlink.net

Gallery Hours:
Mon. -  Sat.  10:00 AM - 5:00 PM


Idyll
Art Supplement, Chicago Tribune, Dec. 28, 1902
 printed by Amer. Color-type Co

The Judgment of Paris
Art Supplement: Chicago Tribune, Sunday, July 20, 1902
Printed by American Color-type Company
 


Little Friend
Art Supplement, Philadelphia Press, Sept. 5, 1897
printed by Harris & Sons, NY


About the Exhibit
For the first time in history fine art was brought into the hands of the general public in the form of the chromolithograph, a color reproduction of a painting or other work of art. In the past art was seen by a privileged few. Beginning in the late 19th century newspapers, calendars, and other ephemera (sometimes called candy-box art) brought reproductions of fine art to the world at large. Newspaper “Sunday Supplements” such as the Chicago Tribune, The Philadelphia Inquirer and other major newspapers often included chromolithographs as a means of promoting the papers circulation. Their enclosed colored reproductions were of good size suitable for framing, about 9 1/2” x 17”.

Ephemera is the plural of the Greek word ephemeron, which means something that lasts only a very short time. When applied to collectibles, ephemera refer to documents of everyday life that were intended to be used and generally expected to be discarded. Art reproductions, greeting cards, product labels, tickets, calendars, invitations and paper dolls are classical forms of paper ephemera.

On view are original chromos mainly from newspapers such as the Chicago Tribune and Philadelphia Inquirer, and other major cities, from the late 1800’s to early 20th century. The subject matter of the chromos are of historical and social interest today because they give the viewer insight into what the public of that time was interested in seeing. Classical European paintings, scenes of the American West, still-life, mythology, animals, exotic women, ships, etc are available (some framed and others in albums). Some digital reproductions of the early chromos, and original oil paintings and watercolors of similar subjects will also be shown.

Chromolithography was the first fundamental printing technology since the invention of relief printing in the fifteenth century. Aloes Senefeider in Germany invented it in 1708. Chromolithography is based on the chemical repellence of oil and water. Designs are drawn with greasy ink or crayons on specially prepared limestone. The stone is moistened with water, which the stone accepts in areas not covered by the crayon. Oily ink, applied with a roller, adheres only to the drawing and is repelled by the wet parts of the stone. Pressing paper against the inked drawing then makes the print.

About The Judgment of Paris
In Greek myth, at the marriage feast of Peleus and the goddess Thetis, Eris (Discard) threw down a golden apple (the apple of Discord) inscribed ‘for the most beautiful’. The goddesses Hera, Athena, and Aphrodite all claimed it, and they applied to Paris, the most handsome of mortal men, then a shepherd on Mount Ida near Troy, to settle the dispute. Each goddess offered him a reward in return for the apple. Hera greatness, Athena success in war, and Aphrodite the most beautiful woman in the mortal world as his wife. Paris awarded the apple to Aphrodite, and with her help carried off Helen, with whom he was in love. It was ultimately this judgment which brought about the Trojan War, but it is not an aspect of the story used by Homer: he retains the hostility of Hera and Athena for Troy, but leaves it unexplained.

Dramatizations
The Judgment of Paris was burlesqued to great effect in the 1902 musical The Golden Apple. In it, the three goddesses have been reduced to three town biddies in small-town in Washington state. They ask Paris, a traveling salesman, to judge the cakes they have made for the church social. Each woman (the mayor's wife, the schoolmarm, and the matchmaker) makes appeals to Paris who chooses the matchmaker. The matchmaker, in turn, sets him up with Helen, the town floozy. And she runs off with him.

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